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  • isvarahparamahkrsnah

    isvarahparamahkrsnah 6:51 am on October 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Arch, , Budgie, Cinnamon, , Deepin, , , Enlightenment, Enso, , Gentoo, Gnome, i3, init, KDE, , , , Liri, LXDE, LXQt, , Mate, Openbox, Pantheon, Plasma, , Semicode, Slackware, , , Ubuntu, XFCE   

    A Brief History Of Krsnah Desktop OS 

    I’ve procrastinated writing this article for almost 7 months now.
    With the next generation of my personalized OS looming in the horizon, I need to get this done right now. Otherwise it’ll never be done.

    What is Krsnah Desktop OS?
    Krsnah Desktop OS is a full-fledged OS based on Linux. Just like it’s sister OS is based on Android.

    Now, when did I get my netbook?
    I think I got it right after my smartphone.
    Somewhere in late 2015 or early 2016, I think.
    Let me check my records!
    Okay! I have a Windows 10 ISO that dates back to Feb 2016. So I must’ve got it around that time.

    My netbook came preloaded with Windows 8.1 and McAfee Internet Security. It also came with a goldfish malware thingy? What’s the word? Spyfish? SUPERFISH! Right. Thanks duckduckgo.

    So I upgraded my netbook to Windows 10 and that didn’t work out quite well because it was just too slow. It was horrible!
    At that time I was quite deep into the whole privacy thing. So I looked into Linux and decided to dive headfirst into it.

    I can’t remember the first Linux distro that I tried. Was it Solus? Or was it Manjaro?
    I think it was Solus. Solus was still quite new at the time and I was really enticed by the Budgie desktop. (Budgie became so popular later on, that a number of distros adopted it – Arch, Gentoo, Ubuntu, Debian and so on.)

    So I tried Solus out but it was still quite new and didn’t have many of the packages I was looking for.
    Since I was coming from Windows, I was looking for an advanced GUI firewall, network monitor etc.
    I ditched Solus pretty quickly. Though I would return to it later on, amidst trying out different distros. When I needed to get back online, I would pop Solus in and get things running pretty fast.

    I looked into Arch.
    Arch was the most interesting Linux brand for me at the time. (It was also overly hyped. Gentoo is the best!)
    I installed Manjaro and had it running for a while.
    However, it had a lot of bugs and I was quickly becoming an angry frustrated computer guy because of it.

    I bumped into Elementary OS.
    Elementary OS is a beautiful distro.
    It runs really nicely and smoothly.
    But at that time, I had a problem with it. What was the OS name? Juno? No! It was LOKI! Yes! Loki! Thanks duckduckgo.
    Loki was fast and smooth. But I could multitask on it because it didn’t detect my SWAP. As a result, it only utilized my 2 Gigs of RAM.

    I think I tried out a bunch of different distros at that time. I checked out Fedora, Subgraph (anyone remember Subgraph? The entire privacy community was chattering about it. Then I downloaded it and couldn’t even get it to install. What a pile of crap! It was an alpha version and apparently it’s still on alpha all this time!
    Who are the developers of Subgraph OS and what have they been doing all this time? Show yourselves! I’m gonna smack you in the head with a tray of eggs.) Debian, Sabayon, Ubuntu, and so on.

    Then I checked out Gentoo. And I was very interested. I think I discovered Enso OS at that time, along with Trenta OS, Liri OS, Semicode OS, and I started noticing a theme.
    I discovered the key to making your own distro.

    Now everyone knows how Android works. Every Android phone basically runs the same OS, except for the minor (or major) tweaks that the smartphone company makes to the user interface, adding a few preinstalled apps etc.
    The biggest difference in Android phones isn’t the OS. It’s the hardware.

    Here’s how Linux works.
    All developers, hold onto your seats! I’m about to crash your egos straight into the ground.
    Arch, Gentoo, Debian, BSD, and Slackware are the forefathers of Linux.
    Every Linux distro out there either borrows something from the above, or is based entirely on the above!

    When you start going through all these distros one after another, constantly switching and trying to find the perfect fit, you come to realize that all these distros have so much in common.

    Then come the desktop environments and window managers. If you’re running Gnome on Gentoo and Gnome on Debian, they’ll look identical.
    No one will be able to tell the difference from a visual perspective.

    The difference comes in the installers, the package managers, the init systems, and of course, some commands.

    One of the problems with most distros is that they’re only customizable up to a certain level. You can change the wallpaper, dock location and transparency and font and some icons. But that’s it! And it is indeed enough for most people to be able to have their personalized desktop. But not me!

    Another problem to be considered when selecting a distro is the availability of apps and how easy it is to build your own should the need arise.
    Unfortunately, that problem has not been solved in any of the derivative distros. Often, developers will only package applications that they think the user would need. So you might not always find what you’re looking for.

    Finally, the main problem to be considered when everything has been sorted out, is how smooth the OS runs and how much resources it needs. I’ve found some distros to be consuming 800+ Megs of Ram on first run, with no user apps running in the background.
    And some lightweight distros only consume 300-400 Mb on idle, with no user apps running.
    Usually these distros came with an ugly LXDE or Openbox window manager. And that just wasn’t cutting it for me.
    If I’m going to spend 6 hours of my day looking at my computer screen, I don’t wanna be staring at a Windows 98 themed LXDE interface.

    Plasma, KDE, Deepin, Pantheon and Gnome are heavy on system resources, whereas i3, LXDE, LXQt, Enlightenment and XFCE are quite lightweight and minimalistic. Mate, Budgie and Cinnamon are somewhere in the middle.

    Arch and Debian had all the packages in the world. Gentoo is missing some. BSD is missing quite a few and Slackware, well, I haven’t tested it. And I don’t think I will any time soon.
    I think a large proportion of Linux users are using Arch, Debian or one of their variants.

    Now, every distro has some bugs. But the worst bugs came from Arch and it’s derivatives.
    The most complex and time consuming is Gentoo. It really takes a while to set things up on Gentoo.

    The above section of this article was written on Tuesday, 13th October 2020.
    It’s now Tuesday, 20th October 2020. And I have absolutely 0 willpower to finish this article right now. Maybe in the future. Until then, that’s all you get.

     
  • isvarahparamahkrsnah

    isvarahparamahkrsnah 7:18 am on October 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , operating system,   

    A Brief History of Krsnah Mobile OS 

    My phone model came out in 2015 running Android 5 Lollipop. The only upgrade that came from the manufacturer was Android 6 Marshmallow about 2 years later. By then I had already installed a Russian build of Marshmallow that worked pretty well for me.
    I installed Android 7 Nougat at around the same time but the battery drained too quickly and the bottom half of the screen flashed on low brightness. Therefore I moved back to Marshmallow and stuck to it for almost 3 years.

    Krsnah Mobile OS was based on from Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow after several tweaks. It was my first attempt at building a personalized mobile OS that catered specifically to my needs. It had major UI changes with a brand new launcher and was fully rooted and debloated. It still ran Google Play Services though.

    Krsnah Mobile OS v2 was based on Android 8 Oreo. It was my first major upgrade since Marshmallow. It included MicroG. I experienced a major issue with the WiFi connectivity where the phone would go into bootloop when connected to the WiFi. I managed to fix the issue from the developer settings. The OS wasn’t as smooth as Marshmallow though. The battery didn’t last as long. I had to charge it everyday, sometimes twice a day, for long usage. It carried on the UI launcher and theme settings from Marshmallow. It couldn’t run Orbot though. And it couldn’t receive phone calls.

    Krsnah Mobile OS v2.1 was another attempt at Android 8.1 Oreo that fixed the WiFi bootloop issues from a fresh install. It used a different launcher and several tweaks in the theme. It got rid of MicroG and ran barebones Android. There were some app incompatibilities and I had to use alternative apps to get around the problem. The major issue was that it kept hanging, all the time; e.g. while playing music, when receiving phone calls, when using apps etc
    This problem had to be fixed urgently.

    Krsnah Mobile OS v3 is the build on Android 9 Pie. It only lasted for a few minutes of use. Since I had directly tested the upgrade from 8.1 Oreo to 10 on my phone, the rollback to 9 Pie seemed like a letdown. Android 9 Pie seems like a half-baked version of 10. It seems like an incomplete OS with many missing features that were finalized in Android 10 release. While 9 Pie was certainly an improvement on 8.1, it wasn’t worth spending time on since I had already tested Android 10.

    Krsnah Mobile OS v4 is built on Android 10. Doesn’t use MicroG. It runs smoothly, is quite fast and doesn’t hang or go into random bootloops. It is free from all bloatware. Battery lasts longer than the previous generations and even more so on standby. The UI launcher and theme are carried on from Krsnah Mobile OS v2.1
    Had an issue running AdAway but it’s now fixed. Also couldn’t run Greenify as there seems to be an app incompatibility. Greenify would randomly close by itself. Haven’t done a comprehensive test on it but everything seems to be good at the moment.

    With that said, I have also installed Krsnah Desktop OS v4.
    This is the first desktop build that directly coincides with the Mobile OS build and with the same number of iterations.
    More on this coming soon.

    — Tuesday, 31st March 2020

     
  • isvarahparamahkrsnah

    isvarahparamahkrsnah 5:31 pm on October 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , ,   

    Covid-19: India’s Seventh Milestone 

    3 days ago – on Friday 9th October 2020, India crossed 7M cases.
    That’s 13 days from the previous milestone.

    Why have the number of daily cases in India dropped significantly while the country has opened everything up?
    Have Indians acquired some magical immunity that the rest of the world is incapable of?
    Or, is the Indian government intentionally screwing the numbers up to avoid overtaking the US by November 1st?

    The US just crossed 8M cases.
    India seems to be lowering the numbers slowly, to avoid global suspicion.

    Are the government’s trustworthy at all?
    Look at Brazil!
    Brazil crossed 5M cases and dropped it’s numbers so fast, it should’ve been some miracle by Christ standing over Rio.
    3139 cases yesterday. Only 3K!
    And the day before that, it was 34,650.
    Did nobody look at the numbers and question, “What the fvck’s going on?”
    Will Jair Bozonaro share the secret of dropping the cases with the rest of the world?
    Where did he learn that trick? Did he learn it from Putin?

    So this is what’s going on with the pandemic.
    China covered up their numbers.
    Russia followed suit. Along with Spain, Italy, France and Ecuador.
    Now Brazil’s tired of being 3rd so Bolsonaro the bozo decided to drop the numbers all at once so some other countries could either catch up or take over.

    Meanwhile the rest of the countries will by now have caught on to the fact that many world leaders are covering up their numbers.
    If China had been honest about their numbers, this trend wouldn’t have become so widespread.

    We can all thank China for spreading the Coronavirus and covering up their numbers shamelessly.
    Thank you China!
    Thank you Xi Jinping for teaching the world a lesson on how to be dishonest!
    Let’s have a round of applause for China.
    Perhaps we can have a barbecue with fried dogs, raccoons, snakes and the world’s favorite – bat soup! It’s time to celebrate!
    Maybe we can go on a tour of the Uighur museum afterwards – the world’s first zoo of human right violations where we can be entertained by a bunch of enslaved uyghurs dancing and clapping whilst singing the Chinese National anthem. And we can feed them with the Hans’ favorite delicacies consisting of roasted pets to show our appreciation for the Chinese national heritage.

    China has gotten away with a lot of dirty deeds. And the rest of the world has determined that they too could get away with the same kind of sh!t if they tried.
    From the China firewall to the extravagant surveillance systems to banning free speech to modern day slavery. China is the real world leader in screwing the citizens.
    Where did they get that idea from? Next door neighbor Kim Jong Il. And the cancerous disease spread over to Russia as well.

    India is not far behind.
    The crap that started in North Korea is spreading slowly like a cancerous growth.

     
  • isvarahparamahkrsnah

    isvarahparamahkrsnah 4:38 pm on October 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: add-ons, , extensions, , , ,   

    Mozilla Sucks! 

    I decided to update the apps from F-Droid and what do I see? Fennec has a new icon!
    Great!

    So I opened the browser after the update and found it had killed all my add-ons except uBlock Origin.
    I tried to install the add-ons again and it didn’t work anymore.

    Since Fennec is based on Firefox, I downloaded Firefox and lo and behold! This is all Mozilla’s new plan!

    Ever heard of the saying – if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it?
    I stopped using Firefox on my desktop since 2016.
    I’ve gone through Vivaldi, Chrome, Chromium, Opera, Falkon, Waterfox… and they all suck! Because each time I settle down for one browser, the devs change something important and fvck up everything for the users.

    The only good thing about Firefox on Android was the extensions. And now they’ve killed it.
    Thanks Mozilla! Great work! What a wonderful job you’ve done in aligning yourselves with the rest of the crappy corporate browsers!

    Perhaps it’s time to consider a personal web browsing solution.

     
  • isvarahparamahkrsnah

    isvarahparamahkrsnah 4:24 pm on October 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Burundi, Congo, , nepotism, , , , ,   

    Racism In South Africa 

    Just opened 9gag to see what’s the latest on the news.
    And what do I see?
    3 articles about 3 different hate-crimes in South Africa.

    Why is the rest of the world not talking about this?
    Why is this not the center of all discussions on the internet right now?

    Well, I’ll tell you why.
    I was born in Africa. I grew up there.
    I know the land. I know the people. I know the culture.
    And I’ve talked about this in one of my articles.
    Racism is normal in Africa.
    Just like in Asia.
    If you’ve lived in Asia, you know how racism works.
    And if you’ve lived in Africa, you know exactly how racism works.

    So how does racism work in Africa?
    Oh I’ll tell you how!
    First of all, every country in Africa has dozens of different tribes. Different tribes do not see eye-to-eye with one another.
    The hatred between the tribes is so prevalent, that there have been multiple genocides in Africa. Hello Rwanda, Burundi, Sudan, Uganda, DRC!

    And then come the Arabs, Indians, Chinese, and Caucasians.
    The Arabs have a reputation for not playing around when it comes to handling troublemakers. So for the most part, they’re left alone.
    The Indians, Chinese and white folks bear the brunt of racism in Africa.

    You can go around and ask any Indian, Chinese or white guy if they have been victims of racism by the local Africans, and the general consensus will be a sound Yes.

    Now, are all Africans racist?
    No.
    Just like every other continent, you’ll find some racist folks, and some lovely folks.

    But things have been changing.
    During the last two decades, there has been a huge shift in the quality of life in Africa.
    And many foreigners who were born in Africa and grew up in Africa have been leaving the continent.
    When I say foreigners in this context, I mean people from other continents who came and settled down in Africa during or after the colonial period.
    The fact is, they are citizens of the various countries in Africa. Both by birth and by law.
    But they’re not treated as such by the native population.
    They are treated as foreigners or invaders. People who came from other continents to steal their privileges and good opportunities.
    Much of the racism stems from this alone.
    And I understand it.

    A large population in Africa is very poor.
    So when the local populace see the Indians and Chinese and Caucasians living comparatively wonderful lives, they feel like they’ve been robbed of what is rightfully theirs.
    The Idi Amin saga in Uganda is a prime example of this.

    You can see the inequality in the job opportunities, work culture and nepotism in the continent.
    The majority of white collar jobs are taken by Indians, Chinese and white folks. Let me put it this way: If you see an Asian or Caucasian, he probably has a white collar job.
    Blue color jobs, pink color jobs, red color jobs and brown color jobs are all taken by the local Africans.

    When you’ve lived there, you can understand why some Africans may hate foreigners living in their countries.
    There is no equal opportunity.
    While the majority of the local Africans go to government schools, the Asians and Whites study in expensive private schools.
    While the majority of Africans will start working immediately after high school, most of the Asians and Whites will go to universities abroad.

    You’ll never find an Asian or Caucasian living in a slum.
    It’s always the underprivileged local Africans who live in tin huts, do drugs, commit crime and dream about modest lives.

    The large portion of white collar crimes committed by Asians and Caucasians go undetected.
    Blue collar crimes and pink collar crimes are often committed by the local Africans.
    These are often out of desperation because they rarely have an alternative. Working regular jobs doesn’t pay much so they resort to crime to continue their livelihood.

    It is a sad situation.
    Considering all the hard-working individuals who never make it big in life.

    Corruption is rampant in Africa.
    You can’t get any work done within the system without paying bribes.
    The governments are wholeheartedly corrupt. And the people who suffer the most are the local Africans who don’t have money to pay bribes. As a result, they’re often mistreated and abused.

    Over the past decade, there has been a rise in violent crimes committed against white farmers in South Africa.
    Things are getting out of hand.
    While the blacks may be eager to kick out the whites, they don’t seem to be adequately prepared to take over the farms.
    A little history lesson can be learned from Zimbabwe.
    Does South African want currency bills of 1,000,000 Rand?

    Overall, I think the African continent has been going downhill since I was born.
    And it’s generally been the same for every other continent and country in the world.
    I just don’t see any improvement anywhere anymore.
    I think the peak development was achieved in the early 2000’s. And ever since then, it’s been a gradual decline.

    Anyway, there’s my thoughts on the racism problem in Africa. It’s never going away. Even if all the “foreigners” were kicked out, the problem would still continue with the infighting among the local ethnic groups.
    And the same applies to Asia. Look at the Middle East, look at India, look at China. Do you think racism will ever cease to exist in these regions?
    Europe and America has made remarkable progress in this regard. But with all the political correctness and sensitive people flocking the internet nowadays, I think those continents have reached peak equality. Anything going forward will only result in a decline.

    I see progress in this regard like a sine wave. When you’ve reached the peak of the curve, it has to go down again.
    Progress is not exponential or infinite.
    That’s just the reality of the material world.
    Under illusion, we may think we’re making progress, but we’re actually moving backwards.

    That’s an interesting phenomenon.
    I’ve watched old historical footage of Europe before the World War and after the World War.
    The cities back then were more beautiful than what they are now.
    The people were also dressed in a more sophisticated fashion than they are now.
    And I guess you can compare many countries and actually see how there has been a decline in the quality of life. India, Iran, Uganda, just to name a few.
    If you can find the footage of these countries from the 1930’s through 60’s, 70’s, 80’s, and compare to what these countries look like today, you’ll notice the stack difference. And it doesn’t look like progress at all.

    Here’s a thought that just crossed my mind.
    Racism existed in the Old Testament and the New Testament.
    If God wanted everyone to live as equals, why did he divide mankind into different races and ethnic groups?
    Interesting question for the theists.
    Okay. I’m just blabbering on now.

    Stop rassisme in Suid-Afrika!
    Dankie.

     
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