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  • isvarahparamahkrsnah

    isvarahparamahkrsnah 6:57 pm on March 2, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , amdgpu_bl0, amdgpu_bl1, backlight brightness, , , , drivers, , , , kernel, , Linus, Linus Torvalds, , linux drivers, nouveau, , nvidia drivers, NVIDIA X SERVER, NVIDIA X SERVER Settings, , screen brightness, , Systemd   

    AMD & NVIDIA: The Enemies Of Linux 

    I just can’t get a break from these dumbass computer hardware manufacturers and their stupid fuckups.

    One of the reasons I wanted a new laptop was to be able to run almost any Linux distro without any issues.
    But that doesn’t seem to be the case, does it?

    I’ve been waiting for several weeks for AMD to fix a backlight issue problem where the screen brightness is 100% on every boot.

    Here’s an example of the error:

    systemd-backlight@backlight:amdgpu_bl0.service – Load/Save Screen Backlight Brightness of backlight:amdgpu_bl0
    Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/systemd-backlight@.service; static)
    Active: failed (Result: exit-code) since Tue 2021-03-02 05:41:00 EEST; 5min ago
    Docs: man:systemd-backlight@.service(8)
    Process: 331 ExecStart=/usr/lib/systemd/systemd-backlight load backlight:amdgpu_bl0 (code=exited, status=1/FAILURE)
    Main PID: 331 (code=exited, status=1/FAILURE)

    Now this problem has been mentioned on several sites – on the kernel site, on AMD’s site, on systemd’s site, and on several distro forums.
    Nobody seems to be doing anything to fix this big fucking problem.

    So my question is, how long will I have to wait for some googley-eyed nerd to sort out whatever’s causing the problem?

    I don’t wanna be blinded by my screen when I turn the laptop on every dawn.
    Every week I checked the site for any updates, and all I see are more users having similar problems.

    So this is my understanding on the issue: Nobody is doing anything to fix a simple backlight issue. Several users have come up with their own hacks but I’m not looking for hacks. I want a perfectly running Linux OS when I do my upgrades.

    I’m not a patient man. Never was.

    Here’s my advice to anyone looking to purchase a laptop and run Linux on it – go for an Intel chip. Fuck it. But a laptop cooler or a mini fridge to put your laptop in, while you’re using it. At least you won’t be blinded by the fucking screen every time you boot or wake the damn thing up.
    Since both AMD and NVIDIA want to fuck around with the Linux users, fuck them both! Intel’s dropping their own GPUs soon. So wait for them and get an Intel CPU with an Intel GPU! How about that, eh?

    I want all the nerds from all sides to get together – have a meeting, and figure out what’s causing this fucking problem and fix it.

    Imagine my horror when I’d just got a brand new fucking laptop, installed my OS in it, upgraded the kernel and wallah! Blinding screen on every boot.

    This problem will have to be fixed. I’m stuck with this machine for the rest of the decade. I don’t want to endure a stupid fucking backlight brightness problem for 10 years.

    I’m raising awareness here.
    This is me, calling out all the nerds and stating the problem.
    This isn’t me, coming out, guns blazing, blowing craters up your asses.
    But my next article, will be a volcanic eruption. Linus Torvalds – that’s your cue.

    While I’m at it, here’s another problem: Why am I not seeing higher boost clock speeds on Linux? Is it AMD’s fault or the Linux kernel’s?
    I haven’t looked into it yet. But before I get down to it, I suggest ya’ll look into it first.

    Now, onto NVIDIA.

    Everyone says AMD GPUs just work on Linux.
    So why don’t NVIDIA’s?
    Why doesn’t the NVIDIA X SERVER Settings work?
    Now my laptop has a dedicated GPU that does fuck-all when running Linux.

    The nouveau nerds are saying NVIDIA has closed sourced their graphics cards. That’s why I’m unable to make use of them.

    Here’s my message to NVIDIA: NVIDIA you chinga a tu madre fuck you motherfuckers hija de su pinche, perra, aguanga, desgraciada madre!
    Open source your goddamn drivers and make sure they’re working like a charm on every goddamn Linux distro on this planet.
    Until that happens, I’m going to be writing an article every month, reminding the entire world just how much NVIDIA SUCKS.

    Linus, are you taking notes?

    AMD, lower your goddamn prices. Just because you’re making better chips than Intel doesn’t mean you should start raping your customers’ wallets.
    If AMD’s 6000 series chips aren’t priced appropriately, I’ll be posting a dozen articles discussing why AMD’s chips aren’t worth the prices, but not without a detailed description of Lisa Su’s adventures with a chimpanzee.

    Linus, the backlight.

     
  • isvarahparamahkrsnah

    isvarahparamahkrsnah 7:32 pm on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Artix, , Devuan, , , , , , Lubuntu, , , OpenRC, , Qubes, , Runit, , , , Systemd, Whonix   

    Linux: Your Distro Sucks! 

    I just posted an article about my Lenovo netbook. To be quite fair, it is the slowest and worst netbook in the history of computers. And it just had to be my luck to be gifted one when my HP laptop died.

    My netbook is so bad, that even a beggar on the streets would bash it on the ground and stomp on it until it broke to pieces.

    The only thing worse than owning this piece of Lenovo crap, is death by Covid-19.

    But I’m the man who had no choices. I didn’t have money to buy another laptop, so I had to figure out a way to make things work.

    The netbook came preinstalled with Windows 8.1. But it was too damn slow. I upgraded it to Windows 10. It was still too damn slow. So I decided to check out Linux.

    Linux in general is known for being lightweight, faster than Windows, and able to run on slow and old hardware.

    However, times are changing fast, and the latest Linux distros can no longer run well on slow and old hardware, especially my netbook.

    Here’s my experience with Linux distros that I’ve tried:

    1. Manjaro: OS did not utilize the SWAP I’d allocated. Running solely on the 2GB RAM made it slow. Package problems showed signs that the OS could break easily during updates, app installations and removal.
    2. Elementary: Loki did not utilize the SWAP. Nice looking distro but too slow on RAM alone.
    3. Solus: Took several hours to figure out how to install. Missing a lot of software.
    4. Fedora: Couldn’t install drivers for WiFi. Hence unusable.
    5. Qubes: Couldn’t meet minimum system requirements to run
    6. Whonix: Couldn’t meet minimum system requirements to run
    7. Debian: Jessie failed to install from Live CD
    8. Subgraph: Failed to install
    9. Sabayon: Failed to complete installation while downloading packages online
    10. Lubuntu: Installed, failed to run, messed up boot options
    11. Krsnah Desktop OS v1.0: Custom Linux build. My first positive experience with an OS on this crappy Lenovo netbook

    Recently there an online debate sparked up regarding systemd’s developer using Google for fallback NTP servers. A lot of people were disgusted by systemd and some people had moved to systems with alternative Inits like Runit and OpenRC I checked out forums and websites mentioning the advantages of Runit and OpenRC over systemd. The general consensus is that Runit and OpenRC are faster, more efficient and easier to manage than systemd. So I thought I’d give it a go.I looked up the distros that used Runit and OpenRC and decided to go with the most popular ones.

    1. Artix – based on Arch. I chose the Runit version. Once I installed it, the OS had no visible package manager. I was left with a bunch of preinstalled basic apps and that was it. There’s less than 100 people on the planet who are currently using Artix. The forums are dead, there isn’t much information available for anyone stuck with a problem, and one has no choice but to sign up, wait for admin approval, and ask questions directly to the devs. I realized that the package manager had to be run from the terminal. There is no front end GUI for their package manager. If there is, users would have to install it manually. I didn’t want to go on a learning curve for an ugly distro which looked like it might die any day now. Did I mention the slow boot times?
    2. Devuan – based on Debian. Website hinted that there might be a lack of drivers for WiFi. Beowulf could not begin installation without formatting the old /home partition. I didn’t have time to backup all the data to an external drive and restore it if and when beowulf disappointed me. So many Linux distros can use the old /home partition without formatting it. What makes Devuan/Debian so special? Boo! Waste of my time.
    3. Lubuntu – Weird installation; poorly written website doesn’t provide any information on configuration during installation. Distro is slow as hell. This is clearly not meant for 2Gb netbooks. Booting is slow, login is slow and the LXQt is the ugliest desktop environment I’ve used. False advertisement. The devs need to specify this distro for high end machines.
    4. Elementary OS – Hera looks beautiful, works like a charm. I’m impressed. Unfortunately, this distro needs a minimum of 4GB RAM. The system uses over 1Gb when idle, so there isn’t much left for applications. Poor utilization of SWAP. Even when running multiple applications, the OS fails to utilize SWAP.

    And so I reinstalled Krsnah Desktop OS v4.3. Took me a day to install all the apps and configure the OS. It works better than any distros that I’ve tried.

    I think the best way to create a distro for low end machines is to build and run them on low end machines. That’s the only way the devs will learn how to utilize the resources efficiently and make the OS fast and fluid to use.

    I’m looking into implementing Runit for Krsnah Desktop OS, which currently uses systemd. However I’m not sure if it will indeed make my system run faster and smoothly when I haven’t seen any positive use cases on the distros that I tried. At the end of the day, making your distro systemd-free doesn’t make a difference if your OS is slow and laggy and has a crappy learning curve.

     
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