ASU & ASUPD impartiality in the Ferrin VS. Ore case is just one more LIE.

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We would like to take a moment to discuss the myth of ASUPD impartiality in this case. Nobody can deny the Officer Ferrin VS. Professor Ore situation is a high profile case where the Arizona State University Police Department features up front and center. Can Chief Mike Thompson explain who is the man, singled out by the arrows, that appears in both of these photos? Is it appropriate for the two top administrators ASUPD chief Mike Thompson and ASUPD assistant Chief Lou Digirolamo (front row left and center) to be socializing with a member of Professor Ore’s defense team/advocacy group before a decision was supposedly made on this case?

Please email them to ask about this issue: Michael.L.Thompson@asu.edu  AND Luigi.Digirolamo@asu.edu

For that matter email the entire Arizona State Police Command, ask them about this issue, check out their bio page qualifications to run a police department: https://cfo.asu.edu/police

A writer and retired police officer writing for the Mesa Tribune found out some interesting facts about this case. http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/columns/east_valley_voices/article_1a07b042-a36c-11e4-956e-0fa5f8404016.html

We found it particularly interesting is the fact that ASU is practicing the over active redacting game on its FOIA requests for a third recorded time showing not only will it federal law and ethical standards for government transparency, it has no impartiality with the information of these two employees, “When I made a public records request for the personnel files for Ferrin and Ore, I was provided with Ferrin’s 47-page file. Ore’s information was a redacted one-pager that gave me her name and not much more. Why give me everything on one employee and not give me everything on the other employee?”

Reposted here with some key points highlighted:

Arizona State University police officer Stewart Ferrin was supposed to be fired this week. The ASU police chief has placed him back on indefinite administrative leave pending further review.

Ferrin arrested ASU professor Dr. Ersula Ore in May 2014 for traffic and criminal charges, including assaulting a police officer. Ore admitted to kicking Ferrin. Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery brought formal criminal charges against her, and she pleaded guilty to the resisting arrest and was sentenced to nine months supervised probation.

Ferrin’s actions were examined at the time of the incident by the university and ASU police officials and deemed appropriate.

Soon after her arrest Ore and her backers played the “race” and “victim” cards. That took the spotlight off of her crimes and breaking a serious university rule regarding assaulting a fellow employee. Ferrin is white; Ore is black.

Assaulting a fellow employee is a serious offense that can result in termination. Employers can’t have a person with a history of violent and assaultive behavior against a fellow employee without taking on considerable legal liability.

In a matter of weeks Ferrin went from being a cop on the night shift in Tempe’s notorious and dangerous “Loud Party Corridor” to being the white cop who attacked a black professor. The obvious implication was Ferrin is a racist.

Ferrin was suspended. Soon after Ferrin was benched, the university provost, one of ASU’s chief executives, sent an email to ASU employees praising Ore and aiming guilt at Ferrin.

The university administration ordered yet another investigation into Ferrin’s conduct. This time it was conducted by a private investigator chosen by the university administration instead of asking for an outside and independent investigation by another police or prosecutorial agency. The Arizona Department of Public Safety’s Special Investigations Unit normally investigates internal police investigations with a high profile, but ASU chose not to go that route.

Police officers are bound by state statute to conduct an independent, complete and impartial investigation or subject themselves to prosecution and revocation of their peace officer certification; private investigators aren’t. Even with Ore’s guilty plea to criminal conduct, she’s kept her job teaching our kids.

When I made a public records request for the personnel files for Ferrin and Ore, I was provided with Ferrin’s 47-page file. Ore’s information was a redacted one-pager that gave me her name and not much more. Why give me everything on one employee and not give me everything on the other employee?

Ferrin’s file revealed he consistently met standards, satisfactorily completed his probation period and was rewarded for his service.

When faced with a possible felony conviction, Ore made a plea agreement. Ferrin has refused resign under pressure and maintains his innocence.

If ASU eventually decides to fire Ferrin it will leave a permanent scar and a lingering stench on the reputation of Arizona State University and its police department.

• Retired Mesa master police officer Bill Richardson lives in the East Valley and can be reached at bill.richardson@cox.net.

 The Integrity Report on the Arizona State University Police Department would like to remind the staff of ASUPD, particularly the command, about the oath we all swore as certified police officers in the state of Arizona.

 I solemnly swear that I will support the constitution of the United States and the constitution of the state of Arizona, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, and defend them against all enemies, foreign and domestic, and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge the duties of a peace officer to the best of my ability, so help me God.

While We Breathe, Let Justice Be Done
Dum Spiramus Fiat Justitia

 Contrast that with what’s going on now.

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