ASU Police still struggles with internal legitimacy, The “Legitimacy Training” ignores it.

??????????The “Legitimacy Training” goes on and on…

The employees of the Arizona State University Police Department have been given two mandatory training sessions totaling 8 hours on the issue of legitimacy, calling it “Legitimacy Training”. In particular, this means the legitimacy of the ASU Police Department in the eyes of the public. Again the legitimacy of the police department to its own employees is ignored for this solution to a problem that doesn’t exist here. The presenters of the training stated repeatedly that no one incident brought about the training, but neglected to specify which incidents did. This is the lying by omission we have come to expect from PD leadership who treat transparency within the agency like its Ebola. If you are running the ASUPD with integrity, then transparency within the agency to build legitimacy among the troops is a no-brainer.

What prompted our “Legitimacy Training”?

Employees understand this so-called “training” to be the result of the Officer Stuart Ferrin and Professor Ursula Ore contact because quite frankly, what else is there in the eyes of the public? Never mind that the Arizona State University cleared Officer Ferrin, the county attorney cleared Officer Ferrin, the courts of Arizona cleared Officer Ferrin, and now the FBI cleared him with the university still failing to act accordingly on the findings. Why wasn’t he at the “Legitimacy training” with the rest of his brothers instead of being forced to stay home? The university is searching for information to support its New American thesis on this issue and still can’t find it.

Unaddressed internal issues decrease ASUPD legitimacy.

The public isn’t aware of other issues with contacts that were alarming to the majority of seasoned officers at ASUPD. Are they aware of the white suspect being assaulted, tased in handcuffs by a black officer who has a preoccupation with race? Probably not. Where is the outrage over that? Where’s the questioning about the use of force, the internal affair investigation, the admin leave? There won’t be any. The people who promote themselves and their agenda by trading in race issues suffered by the generations who came before them have nothing to gain from this story. By turning the cheek on this issue they become part of the problem of racism and why it persists.

Unrelated distractions decrease internal ASUPD legitimacy.

When a police department listens to a college professor exclaim, “…350 years of oppression and 100 years of Jim Crow!” is that supposed to apply to us? It does not. We would have been more impressed with quotations from people who united us than people who pulled us apart. Whether you are African American with this heritage, Jewish with a heritage of 1000 years of oppression, genocide, or have American Indian heritage with hundreds of years of genocide it still does not apply to what we are talking about here today. While all of these things are horrible things, none of it still has anything to do with the ASU police department or what took place on the Officer Ferrin/Assistant Professor Ore contact. Attempting to draw a tie to them when there isn’t one is not only insulting to those who suffered through those eras, but it keeps hate alive.

The university’s emphasis on publicity instead of solutions decreases internal and external ASUPD legitimacy.

The heads of the Arizona State University don’t take any interest in the ASU Police Department unless the department makes the news in a negative manner. Even when the department makes the news the university is interested in a public relations and spin instead of making a lasting change in how it conducts business and holding PD management responsible. The university and its PD management can curse “the blog” all it wants, it can reach out to its corrupt counterparts in AZDPS for a last chance fascist stab at its critics who utilized their 1st amendment rights, but at the end of the day we will be fully engaged on a continual basis because we are not writing the narrative here. The mismanagement of the ASUPD is done with the tacit approval of the ASU university administration who ultimately provide the content and write the narrative. The commanders failed the last chief and they will fail this one. This will go on and on, so you might need more Julie Newbergs unless you intend to fix the problem and stop insulting the personnel who swore to protect you and protect the public whose needs you ignore.

Distractions from the issues and generic solutions decrease internal ASUPD legitimacy.

The first session of the legitimacy training was a tepid coverage of the fundamental rule; treat others the way you would like to be treated. While the ASUPD is a relatively small department it has a diverse group of people who do the policing, not diverse in issues of race, but diverse in their experience and manners of policing. To understand how the ASUPD handles perceived problems it usually ignores them, picks on individuals with no personal connection to ASUPD command, or issues generic blanket statements of intent to the department as a whole where they hit the windows trash bin at the speed of sound.

This latest “training” is one of those generic blanket statements of intent to pacify people who only are making the issue about race and don’t understand it to be a greater problem within ASUPD. The statement in this case is two-fold. The first part is, “You police officers need to treat the public the way you would expect to be treated.” This statement is empty and useless for the majority of our staff because they already do that. We are insulted by the lukewarm attempt to address an issue that doesn’t pertain to us and pertains to a few who are never and will never be disciplined for it. The Pickens protection racket clique still remains intact holding the department back. Either Chief Thompson doesn’t have the will to contend with it or the University administration is micro-managing the department. In either case we will be inspired to seek redress outside the university until the issues are resolved.

What’s the real reason for the ASUPD going to “Legitimacy Training”?

The university management (Morgan Olsen, Kevin Salcido) failed to supervise the university police department management (The command of John L Pickens), who then in turn failed to supervise the police department middle management (Night Sergeants, in this specific case Sergeant Mark Aston), who then failed to supervise officers in the field who made needlessly aggressive contacts common practice. Doing what you think a “cop” is supposed to do isn’t the same as being a cop. Hollywood gets it wrong more than it gets it right and the university policing environment might as well be Hollywood to a city beat cop dealing with serious criminals. We have the luxury of dealing with junky bike thieves or a woman j-walking across a street and refusing to identify herself because she distrusts law enforcement. We are in the media spotlight not because one officer went too far, but because a top heavy with management police department failed to do the one thing it has more than enough staffing for; management.

Establish leadership legitimacy or repeat the “egg on the face” process over and over again.

Michael Crow, Morgan Olsen, Kevin Salcido, this is why more outside non-university police department leadership is essential; they know the reality from the fantasy. Now that we have a chief originally from a city agency running the department, so empower them to do so. Allow the chief to do what he sees necessary to fix this department and if he fails hold him accountable like anyone else. If he fails with no power to make decisions and succeed then who do we have to blame except university leadership? You are not going to get results without establishing internal legitimacy within ASUPD first.

Who knows more about the day to day operations of a police department? People with 20+ years in the business or people who never did the job?  We need people who know the dynamics of the department, who can identify the specific problems of ASUPD and develop solutions for them. The “clique” within ASUPD needs to be out of business ASAP because it has been bad for business. It has been good to its members who received promotion after promotion, self-awarded accolades, special training, out of state paid for trips to do it, much higher than average evaluations done by their friends, and any specialty position they apply for. Don’t put a new chief in the same category as Pickens who turned this place into a country club and referred to us all as “worker bees” while lying to us and you about department issues, and doing nothing effective about them.

Experienced police leadership knows this is a training issue that should have been addressed for a number of officers, not just Ferrin. They know this is a training issue for their corporals, sergeants, who were all standing by watching these events with indifference for years until one of them stopped someone with a voice who could find people to listen.

Experienced police leadership knows this is more than a training issue for the commanders who approved of these trends for years without seeing this problem or many others that could have led to litigation many times over if pursued by the public. The university administration has itself to blame for the public relation fires it’s currently scrambling to put out because it neglected its human resources within ASUPD, it turned its back on its protectors, and we aren’t going to take it. This is over when the problems get fixed; consider this a vote of no confidence in command. If we see changes we can believe in then we will believe, we’ll blog about it. After fourteen years of collective disappointment that’s the way it has to be.

 

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40 thoughts on “ASU Police still struggles with internal legitimacy, The “Legitimacy Training” ignores it.

  1. ThySummons says:

    Looks like Arizona State University made the front page of the Sunday edition of the Arizona Republic, dated Nov. 23, 2014: “Few Convictions in ASU Sexual Assaults.”

    • DL500unit says:

      Another attempt to stop the truth from getting out by not releasing information. Still “working” on cases from 2011 in 2014 nearing 2015? Ok…we all know about the lax free-time, set your own hours environment up in detectives, so that’s bullshit. Is this increased scrutiny why the recent change in detective sergeants just happened? Is it time to get some work done?

      http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/tempe/2014/11/19/asu-sex-assault-how-story-was-done/19298735/

      Here it is: “The ASU Police Department declined to release several police reports on sexual-assault cases in 2011, 2012 and 2013, saying they were still under investigation.

      The university also declined to provide the names of students who were found responsible for sexual assault by the university’s discipline office. This information isn’t protected by federal student-privacy laws. But ASU said it was not releasing any names because of student-privacy concerns.

      ASU also declined to provide the names of victims so The Republic could talk with students about how their cases were handled through the criminal-justice system. The university said releasing the names so The Republic could contact the students could “cause flashbacks, which emotionally place the victim in the moment of the trauma.”

      The Republic has in the past obtained victims names from some other law-enforcement agencies in Arizona, including the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office. State victims’ privacy rights in Section 13-4434 of the Arizona Criminal Code allow certain information to be redacted, such as the victim’s date of birth and address, but not the name.”

    • Getitright says:

      There’s a lot of heat going in the direction of detectives on that article. With the sergeant shift maybe the culture of complacency is changing. With barely a year on patrol Bryner has no business up there. They need some veterans used to interrogation and used to closing cases.

      The latest detective process didn’t look very promising. It’s down to being between one officer who may be qualified and one corporal that hasn’t been to work in over a year due to medical, spent half her career on FMLA. Detectives needs people who can work and not make it another department social club.

    • Quick call Tempe! says:

      If they give it to Cpl. Katie Fuchtman. she will be having a non-stop goof session with Defective Jen Bryner. When that gets broken up because the new Sgt needs them to work then she won’t be there. She’ll be out sick all the time and burning time faster than she accrues it.

      She learned how to work the system from her husband and mentor Sgt Pamela Osborne. Inspiring leadership given the thumbs up by Johnny Pickens and that’s why we are in the pickle we’re in today!

    • Justanotherdispensible50 says:

      @ Quick call Tempe. Hilarious but true. They’ll see what they’re in for if they make that call. They can’t afford to screw around in detectives anymore, people are starting to notice. Sending non-closers back to patrol to avoid more embarrassment would be the smart move. I read the article and it’s clear sexual assault has been an afterthought here. Not good.

    • WheresMy907 says:

      They can’t afford to give it to someone who isn’t going to be there, especially with how much attention detectives is getting. I think they pride themselves on making bonehead decisions nobody can make sense of. Hopefully that’s getting neutered under Thompson.

  2. DL500unit says:

    If you don’t have the will to face the issues in the open and do something about the problems then this is what you do. This is more political correctness bullshit meant to appease people in charge that don’t know what the problem is or how we got here. The fact is the vast majority of the public supports us, the ones who don’t are getting booked into jail and have no respect for the law in the first place.

    If you have new officers being thrown to the street without any mentoring, supervision, or care for their development that’s one thing, but the clique was all to eager to sit back and point their finger at Officer Ferrin without offering him any guidance for his development.

    That’s what they’ve done for years, shitting on others to prop up themselves as something special, drawing so much attention to other people they get no attention themselves. The former chief enjoyed the infighting because if you can’t lead through the power of inspiration you lead through the power of despair.

    The FBI findings need to be publicized so everyone can see past the race cards and figure out what really happened. It wasn’t racism, it was no experience, no training, no mentoring, no supervision, no good examples, and command that failed to make sure these things were happening. Officer Ferrin is a good officer, but like all new officers they need these things to be successful career officers.

    • Getitright says:

      These are all good points and ones that need to be taken seriously if things around here are going to change.

    • Quick call Tempe! says:

      It’s all about pandering to the loudest special interest groups and appearing as politically correct as possible. If you’re looking for a backbone you have come to the wrong place.

  3. ImJohnDoe says:

    Here is an excerpt from a comment I made on another topic. It applies here as well.

    “Here was the perfect opportunity for the Chief to demonstrate leadership and stand up for his troops and openly set the record straight, as should have happened this past summer, and tell the world that race was not a part of the arrest and race was only brought into the equation when the professor went to the media.

    Thompson knows this to be true and yet, instead of doing so, he acquiesced to the incorrect info being given out by the interviewer and babbled on about the wonderful diversity training that he has recently mandated on the masses.”

    ASU puffed up it’s chest over the FBI coming to town to investigate the Ferrin/Ore thing but they have been silent ever since. No announcement that the FBI was done, or that they left, or that they did not find any wrong doing.

    Why not publicize that as well? Does it not fall into some agenda that has been set? Seems like a leader would want to publicize this and support his officer.

    In fact, didnt we all get an email recently suggesting we offer support to Ferrin? Another missed opportunity chief……

    • Getitright says:

      It looks more and more like the university administration runs the ASU Police Department. You know, with their many years not in any law enforcement capacity, who’s more qualified? Part of taking public safety seriously is letting professionals manage it. More ivory tower snoots looking down on vocational jobs.

      I don’t believe Michael Crow, Morgan Olsen, and Kevin Salcido are done having their hands deeply in the process. After the truth of how Pickens ran the place into ruin comes out they are afraid to let go. People can say what they want about M Thompson, but thank god he’s no Pickens! If he’s allowed to run ASUPD there may be some retractions in popular opinion at the pd with positive mentions of what he’s accomplished.

      It’s going to take more media exposure to get the university serious about public safety. They obviously don’t care about law suits, it’s just more public money they don’t have to account for.

    • Quick call Tempe! says:

      Missed opportunities for sure. Everytime we see the Pickens gravy train still wasting space in command it’s a reminder of squandered opportunities, squandering opportunity, and looming failures on the horizon due to opportunities yet squandered.

    • Justanotherdispensible50 says:

      Are they finally done shopping around for the guilty verdict on Ferrin that nobody but them and race based organizations are hoping for? Give it a break already with the reverse racism. The world is already diverse with assholes looking out for themselves, not people who unite us.

    • Embudo says:

      Many outside the university are now taking a keen interest on what’s going on with Officer Ferrin.

      It should be interesting to see how this will eventually play out.

  4. Quick call Tempe! says:

    We don’t have a profiling problem, we don’t have a use of force problem. You are right, we have what any other department would call a supervision problem. We have too many supervisors and too few qualified as leadership material.

    You said Ferrin was cleared by the FBI? Great, now what? Get him reinstated asap. What kind of gerrymandering are they going to do around the issues I instead of facing the problem? Is Associate professor Ore the type of professor being promoted by the new American university?

    • Justanotherdispensible50 says:

      They are unscrupulously playing political games with a young family man’s career and livelihood. They should be ashamed of themselves for being too cowardly to stand by their first decision on the matter. They need a class on ethical decision making, because it’s not just about making easy decisions or bending with the wind.

  5. Justanotherdispensible50 says:

    Don’t we need a flaming liberal with militant views about race yelling at a bunch of cops every now and then just to keep things interesting at the university?

    Plenty of people, of every color, have experienced racism, bigotry of religion, or some discrimination over the last 200 years. I only see one group still trying to ride the coat tails of it and it’s getting so old it’s a cliche in pop culture comedy.

    You are right about the training, mentoring, and supervision issues. This department has been struggling with them for years and still does. John Pickens let the bullies run wild here and it really damaged the internal legitimacy of this department.

  6. WheresMy907 says:

    All the public relations gimmicks don’t do us any good when we have a dysfunctional department where our greatest threat comes from our management and some of our coworkers. Years of shitty leadership created an every man for himself environment and sabotaged the development of this police department. The best talent left and succeeded elsewhere.

    Our turnover rate is horrendous, we are constantly training people because we are constantly losing people. Does anyone bother to answer why the fuck this keeps happening year after year? This is what happens when a bunch of insecure assholes and their friends are given free reign to abuse the responsibility given to them for public safety.

    The clique still dominates command and still feels free to undermine our mission by acting out against other employees. With this new publicity, the failure in detectives, the old “we eat our own” mentality is really paying off now. They feel secure in their jobs, so the attitude is why not?

    • Embudo says:

      Chief Thompson, it would behoove you to read the preceding comment and take what has been written to heart.

      You need to communicate to your boss, Dr. Morgan Olsen, that you need to make some radical personnel and structural changes within the PD.

      If you don’t have the backbone and tenacity to do your job as chief of police, then move on and let someone else take on the task of fixing the innumerable problems in the PD.

  7. ComeOnNow says:

    The Integrity Report makes the claim in this post that poor supervision under Sergeant Aston contributed to Officer Ferrin’s incident. The problem with that claim is that Aston was out injured for almost 2 months before the incident and Sergeant Epps was the sergeant in charge during his absence. The question is will the Integrity Report maintain the integrity of the argument and issue a correction that shifts the blame to Epps or will it change the claim in light of this information? (For the record, I don’t think Epps or Aston are to blame. I’m just interested to see if the Integrity Report has the fortitude to maintain their argument).

    • theintegrityreport says:

      Not backing down from that claim, sorry. It’s goes beyond poor supervision.

      Ferrin was on Aston’s squad for a significant amount of time prior to Aston leaving on injury. It was more than enough time to for Aston to set the tone for the squad about his expectations (or lack thereof), as well as serve as an example to Ferrin of how police work should NOT be done. Aston and company have a particular ‘style’ of policing, and if you fail to follow it…prepare to the deal with the consequences of having your reports nitpicked and rejected, criticized on how you do things a certain way, etc.

      The small amount of time Ferrin worked with Epps (who is a solid supervisor) wouldn’t be enough to un-do all the horrible ‘mentoring’ done by Aston.

    • yurhuckleberry says:

      Which injury? I don’t have the dates, but I believe the Aston motorcycle karma incident happened some time after the initial Ferrin/Orr incident, which happened weeks before it hit the media.

      Prior to this contact sergeants were going to Aston asking wtf, are you bothering to supervise or are you hiding out in the armory all night? The integrity report is correct, Aston was his supervisor nearly the whole time he was in training (nights) and once he was released from training.

    • ComeOnNow4real says:

      Wow, what a mind-bending puzzle you present. Ok, I’ll take a stab at it.

      If a sergeant is an asshole to the public, mentors his officers to act like assholes to the public, then leaves due to an injury and those officers have a new sergeant known for not an asshole to anyone how difficult is it for the new sergeant to change the squad’s attitude to making contacts?

      You’re right, none of this has anything to do with the young officer who just got his badge yesterday.
      Absolutely nothing could influence a rookie officer because they were released from out stellar training program with everything they need. You don’t really believe that do you?

    • guerriero says:

      Ha ha ha…you expect anyone who works here to believe this premise?

  8. Howard Roark says:

    I’m not impressed that Officer Ferrin was cleared by the FBI and others. I’m glad that ASU is keeping that jerk off duty.

    • yurhuckleberry says:

      Howard, Do you believe there’s a difference between being a jerk and being a rascist? I do. Does Stuart have to accept personal responsibility for how he conducts himself with the public? Absolutely. The university would have the public believe this was a fluke, a one off incident, and they are being less than truthful.

      The fact of the matter is that the homeless, college kids, and petty criminals don’t have the same access or capacity for redress as a college professor. When that professor is anything but white the capacity for publicity and public sympathy increases. Personallly I don’t care what color a person is, it’s irrelevant unless you truly have a case of rascism and we don’t in this case. Again, there is a difference between a jerk and a rascist. Just because a cop is white and the contacted person is black doesn’t mean the cop is rascist. I’m sure the FBI looked at the race of his contacts and broke down who was who and so forth to see if there was a pattern.

      Stuart Ferrin was a blank book when it came to policing because he is a young inexperienced man released from training not long before this initial incident. He’s a good guy, but he has a lot to learn about interpersonal communication like some other officers in this agency who have been here longer and whose exploits never made the news.

      Where did he learn policing from? His trainers, other officers, supervisors here a ASUPD. There were plenty of opportunities to modify how he made contacts prior to this media explosion. What happened? This incident didn’t happen in a vaccuum, there’s more to this than what the public is aware of.

      Nothing happened because it was status quo, it’s been common for years, and nobody expected the media attention. We frequently come across people doing things dangerous to themselves or others because they are high on something. Should we just drive around them and leave them in the street or contact them to see what’s going on to keep them from getting hit by a car?

      I thought they both could have been more respectful, courteous, and this should never have gone physical. If he’s not fit to be an officer here is she fit to be a professor? Have you seen her reviews? Whew! If she didn’t like how he was acting she could have given her I’D, verbally if she didn’t have it with her, and called to talk with a supervisor to file a complaint.

      Command at ASUPD is more than happy to take complaints on it’s officers because that’s the surest way of retaining our thin numbers. It sabotages officers from going to other departments, that’s why our command pulls IA numbers for everything rather than doing a review first. What a great way to support your troops! What a great way to support the people who risk their lives protecting you from bad people!

      Our police world is somewhat different than your typical 9-5 job. Everything thing we do is increasingly under observation and while I believe that’s a good thing to prevent abuse, to keep everyone honest, it should also come with a user manual to show the public what we are dealing with on a frequent basis in order to put everything in perspective.

    • Howard Roark says:

      Yurhuckleberry, Thanks for the thoughtful reply. I really appreciate the good sense and respect that you communicated. You asked about a difference between being a jerk and being a racist. Honestly, my anger over this incident has nothing to do with the racial elements. I was just very angry that a big guy in a police uniform would physically assault a lady three seconds into their conversation. Officer Ferrin is a dangerous hothead, in my opinion, and he needs to be dropped from the force before he really hurts someone. I witnessed similar idiotic examples of bullying police brutality in Philadelphia over the years, and resented how these assholes always got away with it. They have that negative reputation for a damn good reason. So, it infuriated me to see that jerk, “Officer” Ferrin pulling that same crap on an unarmed lady in the middle of the street! Ferrin needs to go. Maybe he can get a job washing cars, or something.

    • ImJondoe says:

      Howard, I can understand your frustrations and do not intend to take away from the experiences and perceptions you had in Philly. However, in this case you are ill informed if you think “that a big guy in a police uniform would physically assault a lady three seconds into their conversation.”

      Clearly there was interaction that took place before the video started rolling. Would it change things if there had been several polite requests to get up on the sidewalk that went ignored? How about if the lady presented an entitled, arrogant attitude? How about if she then refused to comply with the officer’s demands? What then, should the officer just give up and walk away?

      At some point, it became necessary to take the lady into custody. As I watched the video, I thought officer Ferrin provided her with ample opportunity to comply and most cops I know would have subdued her sooner and with less patience than he did.

      Whether you agree with the reason for the contact, you still can not resist arrest. Perhaps she should have complied and then later used one of the many avenues available to her to “protest” the arrest.

      But, in my opinion, once a person starts to resist an officer, that officer needs to take decisive action and gain control of the person before things escalate further. She may have been “unarmed” (today’s new buzz word) but there is always a weapon available any time an officer is present and we have seen too many instances across the country of suspects taking an officers gun and using it on the officer.

      Could Officer Ferrin have handled things differently? Perhaps……but that requires experience and training, neither of which has been afforded him, as a result of failed ASUPD leadership.

      And, dont forget that 6 weeks passed between the arrest and the media attention and that ASU reviewed the arrest and came out publicly supporting Officer Ferrin.

      Is there no responsibility placed on the Professor and her behavior?

    • ImJohnDoe says:

      Howard, I can understand your frustrations and do not intend to take away from the experiences and perceptions you had in Philly. However, in this case you are ill informed if you think “that a big guy in a police uniform would physically assault a lady three seconds into their conversation.”

      Clearly there was interaction that took place before the video started rolling. Would it change things if there had been several polite requests to get up on the sidewalk that went ignored? How about if the lady presented an entitled, arrogant attitude? How about if she then refused to comply with the officer’s demands? What then, should the officer just give up and walk away?

      At some point, it became necessary to take the lady into custody. As I watched the video, I thought officer Ferrin provided her with ample opportunity to comply and most cops I know would have subdued her sooner and with less patience than he did.

      Whether you agree with the reason for the contact, you still can not resist arrest. Perhaps she should have complied and then later used one of the many avenues available to her to “protest” the arrest.

      But, in my opinion, once a person starts to resist an officer, that officer needs to take decisive action and gain control of the person before things escalate further. She may have been “unarmed” (today’s new buzz word) but there is always a weapon available any time an officer is present and we have seen too many instances across the country of suspects taking an officers gun and using it on the officer.

      Could Officer Ferrin have handled things differently? Perhaps……but that requires experience and training, neither of which has been afforded him, as a result of failed ASUPD leadership.

      And, dont forget that 6 weeks passed between the arrest and the media attention and that ASU reviewed the arrest and came out publicly supporting Officer Ferrin.

      Is there no responsibility placed on the Professor and her behavior?

  9. Embudo says:

    Chief Thompson, Apparently you still have some employees in the PD that feel they have the license to treat other employees with disrespect and contempt.

    As chief of police, we would highly recommend that you send out a strongly worded email to all PD employees reminding them that the days of treating employees like they are disposable garbage is over.

    Chief Thompson, You set the tone for how your commanders, sergeants, supervisors, and deeply entrenched firing range clique, operate and interact with employees.

  10. ASUPDsmokeNmirrors says:

    More diversion from the real issues, my god this is frustrating. FYI, you must be kicking the shit out of these guys. They are now opening up a position for a full time dedicated PIO, public information officer.

    We are still jumping through hoops to fill shifts, but they want a full time pio…ok. We are closed to hiring more officers, but will hire more and more police aides…ok. Some people never learn. Smoke and mirrors isn’t the answer dumb dumbs.

    How about getting serious about preventative policing so you are not having to look like snake oil salesmen everytime a story breaks about how you fucked something up? Like someone else said, they are spending the public’s hard earned money on all the elaborate spin bullshit so who’s making sure it’s money well spent?

    Perhaps the university administration, ABOR, both need more oversight from state government to get things in order. It’s painfully obvious they can’t be trusted to do it themselves.

    • Farewell says:

      We will continue to publicly pummel the ASU administrators and the ASUPD command staff that are responsible for the current pathetic state of affairs in the department.

      Who ever is hired as the new ASUPD public information officer better be well-prepared for the barrage of public inquiries coming his/her way.

    • LDS says:

      It’s good that the university and its police department are coming under more and more public scrutiny.

      There has to be some accountability when taxpayers’ funds are being used to partially subsidize this public institution.

    • ComeOnNow4real says:

      ASUPDsmokeNmirrors, you are correct, the more they neglect to fix the ASU police department the more this needs to widen and expand. The public, the new governor, and the state legislature need to become aware of the public safety situation at ASU and the mismanagement behind it.

      Clearly they decided to dig their heals in because hollow pride won out over solid prudence. We are not seeing the necessary changes. It looks like there will be more news exposure because some men in the university administration refuse to honor public service and fix the problems at their police department.

      They fell into the same management model as AZ CPS, the AZ Veteran Administration, and it will take determination, hard work, and moral fiber to reveal the story behind it. It will be revealed like all the others to the shame of the people who stood by and denied everything instead of fixing the issues.

  11. JustTheFacts says:

    FACT: The people who needed this training didn’t attend it. For the rest of us who police with excellence, honor, and do our duty it was an insult. I don’t treat people differently from other people based on anything other than behavior. It doesn’t matter what color they are, what religion they are, their sexual preference, none of it.

    Having said that I’m so sick and tired of people exclaiming some kind of special preference for these reasons. Nearly every group of people find an excuse to be indignant about something, but without much of a reason in the world we live in today.

    Everyone wants something for nothing. I don’t respect people like that anymore than I respect the welfare mom with 4 kids sitting on her ass at home planning her 5th and spending her yearly, “you got a lot of kids check” like a lottery prize.

    This is the America we live in today, full of special interest groups yelling as loud as they can to get more than they deserve. Full of people with their hands out not willing to help themselves because they know they will get something for nothing. Something someone else had to work and get taxed to death for.

    Don’t like it in Arizona? Go back to the places where the majority of people think like you and see what happens to that part of the country over the next 20 years. There’s a pattern of repeated mistakes and failure because, like the university administration, everyone is too damn proud to admit a mistake and fix it like responsible people.

  12. DontLOLmeJP says:

    Officers in AZ deal with lethal force encounters on a regular basis and nobody bats an eye. When one officer at ASU makes the news in 40 years because he’s white and arrests a black professor everyone loses their minds. If she had a case then why didn’t she sue or fight it court? The whole contact left me asking for each person, was it worth it? Two egos clashed that night.

  13. BurningheapofFail says:

    How legitimate is your police department when we are approaching three years of every department member’s email filling up with desperate pleas to work department overtime to cover empty patrol shifts?

    That’s not normal unless you work at the ASU police department. That’s a hint that something is wrong, but all they can say is we are hiring more people…for three years. The MO BODIES strategy came from someone no longer employed by this department.

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